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Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2021

Daniel Tyler
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Booth, Wayne C., The Rhetoric of Fiction, 2nd ed. (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1991)Google Scholar
Brook, Peter, Realist Vision (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2008)Google Scholar
Cohn, Dorrit, Transparent Minds: Narrative Modes of Presenting Consciousness in Fiction (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1978)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davidson, Jenny, Reading Style: A Life in Sentences (New York: Columbia University Press, 2014)Google Scholar
Duncan, Dennis, and Smyth, Adam, Book Parts (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019)Google Scholar
Fish, Stanley, How to Write a Sentence: And How to Read One (New York: Harper, 2011)Google Scholar
Genette, Gérard, Narrative Discourse, trans. Lewin, Jane E. (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1988)Google Scholar
Greenberg, Jonathan, The Cambridge Introduction to Satire (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019)Google Scholar
Houston, Keith, Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation, Symbols & Other Typographical Marks (New York: Norton, 2013)Google Scholar
Hurley, Michael, and Waithe, Marcus (eds.), Thinking through Style: Non-fiction Prose of the Long Nineteenth Century (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, Hermione, Body Parts: Essays on Life Writing (London: Vintage, 2010)Google Scholar
Macfarlane, Robert, Landmarks (London: Hamish Hamilton, 2015)Google Scholar
Masters, Ben, Novel Style: Ethics and Excess in English Fiction since the 1960s (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mieszkowski, Jan, Crises of the Sentence (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2019)Google Scholar
Milbank, Alison, God and the Gothic: Religion, Romance and Reality in the English Literary Tradition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mullan, John, How Novels Work (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008)Google Scholar
Parkes, M. B., Pause and Effect: Punctuation in the West (Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1992)Google Scholar
Stewart, Garrett, Novel Violence: A Narratography of Victorian Fiction (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stewart, Garrett, The Value of Style in Fiction (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Tyler, Daniel (ed.), Dickens’s Style (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tyler, Daniel (ed.), On Style in Victorian Fiction (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021)Google Scholar
Wood, James, How Fiction Works, 2nd ed. (New York: Picador, 2018)Google Scholar
Wood, James, The Nearest Thing to Life (London: Jonathan Cape, 2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Daniel Tyler, University of Cambridge
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Prose
  • Online publication: 05 November 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108939201.018
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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Daniel Tyler, University of Cambridge
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Prose
  • Online publication: 05 November 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108939201.018
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Daniel Tyler, University of Cambridge
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Prose
  • Online publication: 05 November 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108939201.018
Available formats
×