Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-jbqgn Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-15T21:40:38.387Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

14 - Opera, genre, and context in Spain and its American colonies

from Part II - National styles and genres

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 September 2011

Anthony R. DelDonna
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
Pierpaolo Polzonetti
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Get access

Summary

Opera had a richly textured history in eighteenth-century Spain and its empire, though a relatively small number of fully sung operas in Spanish were produced in the period. In the peninsular capitals, Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, and Cádiz, and in the administrative centers of its colonies, Naples, Palermo, Lima, and Mexico City, operas and musical plays were performed in a variety of situations, public and private, and sponsored by both aristocratic patrons and eager entrepreneurs. The history of opera in this period is intertwined with the history of musical theater, given that opera coexisted with several types of partly sung entertainment (zarzuela, tonadilla escénica, and sainete) and embraced a number of musical styles. The classic Spanish comedia – a three-act, tragicomedic genre that usually included songs in verisimilar situations – was still widely performed in the early 1700s. Indeed, scholars now recognize that its conventions were extremely influential well into the eighteenth century. In part, this influence remained vigorous because the traditional mechanisms for theatrical administration and financing were so well engrained. Public theaters, known as corrales, continued to present spoken theater with almost daily performances for an eager audience, much as they had almost continuously since the opening of the first purpose-built public theaters in Madrid and elsewhere just before 1600.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×