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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2024

Katherine Chambers
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University of New England, Australia
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  • Bibliography
  • Katherine Chambers, University of New England, Australia
  • Book: Augustine on the Nature of Virtue and Sin
  • Online publication: 10 January 2024
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009383790.010
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  • Bibliography
  • Katherine Chambers, University of New England, Australia
  • Book: Augustine on the Nature of Virtue and Sin
  • Online publication: 10 January 2024
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009383790.010
Available formats
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  • Bibliography
  • Katherine Chambers, University of New England, Australia
  • Book: Augustine on the Nature of Virtue and Sin
  • Online publication: 10 January 2024
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009383790.010
Available formats
×