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9 - Monitoring Long-Term Outcomes of ART: Linking ART Surveillance Data with Other Datasets

from Section 3 - Using ART Surveillance Data

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 June 2019

Dmitry M. Kissin
Affiliation:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta
G. David Adamson
Affiliation:
Fertility Physicians of Northern California, Palo Alto
Georgina Chambers
Affiliation:
National Perinatal Epidemiology and Statistics Unit, University of New South Wales, Sydney
Christian De Geyter
Affiliation:
University Hospital Basel
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Summary

Infertility affects an estimated 80 million individuals worldwide, or 10–15% of couples of reproductive age. The number of assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles in the United States more than doubled between 2000 and 2013. In 2015, about 1.7% of all live births in the United States were the result of this technology. In the US, studies of the long-term outcomes of ART involve the challenge of linking databases, in which one database has information on the treatment parameters, and the other database captures the outcomes of interest. This chapter discusses the linkage efforts, methodologies, and resulting research in the US by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the health linkages routinely performed in the Nordic countries. Strengths and limitations of these approaches are also discussed.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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