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Section 1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2021

Edward A. Wasserman
Affiliation:
University of Iowa
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Summary

In my book, I explore the origin and evolution of a variety of behavioral innovations – including the Butterfly Stroke, the High Five, and the Heimlich Maneuver – which appear to have been ingeniously and foresightfully designed. More commonly, however, these creative acts have actually arisen “as if by design.” This revelation requires a much more thorough look into the histories of these innovations in order to better understand the very nature of behavioral creativity. What emerges is an intricate web of causation involving three main factors: context, consequence, and coincidence. By concentrating on the process rather than the product of innovation, I elevate behavior to its proper place – at the very center of creative human endeavor – for it is truly behavior that produces the innumerable innovations that have captivated thinkers’ imagination. Those most splendid theories, goods, and gadgets would never have come into being without the behaviors of their inventors.

Type
Chapter
Information
As If By Design
How Creative Behaviors Really Evolve
, pp. 1 - 16
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

References

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Wasserman, E. A. (2019). Precrastination: The fierce urgency of now. Learning & Behavior, 47, 728.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

References

Colin, T. R. and Belpaeme, T. (2019). Reinforcement Learning and Insight in the Artificial Pigeon. CogSci: Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, 15331539.Google Scholar
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  • Introduction
  • Edward A. Wasserman, University of Iowa
  • Book: As If By Design
  • Online publication: 01 July 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108774895.001
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Save book to Dropbox

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  • Introduction
  • Edward A. Wasserman, University of Iowa
  • Book: As If By Design
  • Online publication: 01 July 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108774895.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Edward A. Wasserman, University of Iowa
  • Book: As If By Design
  • Online publication: 01 July 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108774895.001
Available formats
×