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13 - Distributive Justice: Locating in Context

from Part Two - Human Rights Issues

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2012

Bhagat Oinam
Affiliation:
Jawaharlal Nehru University
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Summary

One of the major problems of distributive justice is about the State providing equal opportunity to its citizens to acquire equal resources and, subsequently, attain equal welfare. Though I have used the terms and their relationships little too loosely, their theoretical and praxiological implications are problematic to a large extent. Not only are there difficulties in talking about an ‘objective’ conception of welfare but also in dealing between resources and welfare or between resources and opportunity. Government, providing opportunity to its citizens to enter public sectors in addition to demanding services from its citizens, aims at enabling realisation of welfare for the citizens. On the other side, the nature of welfare's definition may differ from, say, the mental states (qualitative) of the persons concerned to the measure of material wealth people could acquire. Again, measuring welfare in terms of material goods may mean bringing the equality of welfare close to the equality of resources. The problems are indeed wide beyond the purview of this particular paper. I have only tried to glean over a few problems out of the many introduced here.

In this paper I have attempted to highlight only a few problems that crop up with the State's propagation of distributive justice based on economic and social enhancement of a group depending upon certain social criteria. That is, on State's attempt to enhance opportunity to acquire ‘equal’ resources to some of its citizens who are socially and economically backward.

Type
Chapter
Information
Applied Ethics and Human Rights
Conceptual Analysis and Contextual Applications
, pp. 171 - 182
Publisher: Anthem Press
Print publication year: 2010

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