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15 - Conclusion: Policy Implications of ESG–Agency Research and Reflections on the Road Ahead

from Part Three - Policy Implications and the Future of Agency in Earth System Governance Research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2020

Michele M. Betsill
Affiliation:
Colorado State University
Tabitha M. Benney
Affiliation:
University of Utah
Andrea K. Gerlak
Affiliation:
University of Arizona
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Summary

− The role of the state as an agent of earth system governance has become more complex, contingent, and interdependent. − Although participatory and collaborative processes have contributed to more effective, equitable, and legitimate environmental governance outcomes in some instances, analyses of these processes should be situated within a broader governance perspective, which recasts questions of policy change around questions of power and justice. −The complexity and normative aspects of agency in earth system governance requires new forms of policy evaluation that account for social impacts and the ability of governance systems to adapt. − Many of the core analytical concepts in ESG–Agency scholarship, such as agency, power, authority, and accountability, remain under-theorized. In addition, some types of actors, including women, labor, non-human agents, those who work against earth system governance, and many voices from the Global South, remain largely hidden. − ESG–Agency scholars need to develop research projects and collaborations in understudied regions while also recruiting and supporting scholars in those regions to engage with this research agenda.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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