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10 - A transactional model of implementing EBP

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 April 2022

Lawrence A. Palinkas
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
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Summary

We will use the results from the study, but it is not really about practice alone for us. The big benefit is that it begins to change the culture of the agency. It becomes a learning agency. We become an agency that has the wherewithal to develop new programs informed by research. We get to be a co-creator; we get to be an innovator. We get to be part of the group that advances the field. In addition, having your name on the research makes it easier to get funding to support the programs. It also has an impact on staff morale. Staff take pride when our own research demonstrates favorable results. (Program director)

Each of the previous five chapters focused on a specific component of EBP implementation, providing detail on how they manifest themselves in social and mental health services that target children and adolescents and their implications for the broader challenge of understanding and facilitating successful implementation of EBPs in any service setting. In Chapter Five, we examined social networks and inter-organizational collaboration and the role they played in the implementation of TFCO in California and Ohio. We then focused on URE as an illustration of both social interactions that facilitate URE and the shared understandings that comprise the organizational culture of URE. This was followed by another illustration of shared understandings, one that comprised the models of and for assessment of the barriers and facilitators of EBP implementation. We then returned to a focus on social relations and shared understandings that operate in the context of research–practice partnerships dedicated to the task of EBP implementation. This was followed by an examination of the exchanges of knowledge, attitudes and practices among implementation partners and the transformations in shared understandings that result from such exchanges.

This chapter summarizes the five components of a model for successful implementation of EBPs in child welfare and child mental health. It also examines the implications of this model in the design and implementation of three implementation ‘facilitators’ or support systems: 1) the development of policies that promote EBP use; 2) the development and use of strategies that facilitate EBP implementation; and 3) the formation and maintenance of partnerships that promote ongoing quality improvement in services delivery.

Type
Chapter
Information
Achieving Implementation and Exchange
The Science of Delivering Evidence-Based Practices to At-Risk Youth
, pp. 189 - 200
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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