Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-9th95 Total loading time: 0.275 Render date: 2022-12-05T19:26:50.004Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

5 - Social networks and EBP implementation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 April 2022

Lawrence A. Palinkas
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Get access

Summary

I go monthly to the Children's System of Care meeting in Sacramento. And that's where other people in similar administrative positions to myself who are responsible for children's mental health services, we chew on these kinds of things. We discuss these kinds of things. And, you know, we have presentations, and so forth. So that is my peer group. And that, uhm, certainly provides a lot of information to me in making decisions. (Mental health services director)

In this chapter, we examine in detail the role of social networks in implementation process and outcomes. Beginning with a review of the importance of such networks in current implementation theories, models and frameworks, we focus on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation and Sustainment (EPIS) framework developed by Aarons and colleagues (2011), and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) developed by Damschroder and colleagues (2009). The chapter then summarizes research on the influence of social networks and inter-organizational collaborations in implementing Treatment Foster Care Oregon (TFCO) (Chamberlain et al, 2007), an EBP designed to meet the behavioral health needs of youth in foster care, in California and Ohio. This research also demonstrates how community development teams, a continuous quality improvement strategy developed by the California Institute of Mental Health, can be used to build and sustain such networks.

Interpersonal contacts and implementation

Interpersonal contacts within and between organizations and communities are among the most important influences on the adoption of new behaviors. Interpersonal relations were given a prominent role in diffusion theory in explaining how new ideas and cultural practices expand within and between communities (Green et al, 2009). The importance of interpersonal contact and the social networks that provide such contacts in the diffusion of new ideas and practices has been repeatedly demonstrated by empirical research, including the pioneering study of Ryan and Gross (1943), which emphasized the importance of social factors in understanding farmers’ adoption of new patterns of behavior. Rogers (2003) also emphasized the importance of social networks for both the diffusion and adoption of innovations. These contacts may influence the behavior of individual providers or the behavior of entire organizations.

Type
Chapter
Information
Achieving Implementation and Exchange
The Science of Delivering Evidence-Based Practices to At-Risk Youth
, pp. 75 - 98
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×